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Posted on: August 16, 2017

Eclipse Safety and Traffic Information

total-solar-elipse-diamondring

The City of Goodlettsville would like to advise our citizens and business owners to expect moderate to major traffic delays this weekend into early next week as a part of the solar eclipse on Monday, August 21st. The city has been planning for this event for the past nine months in preparation of this visitation it will generate. The projected count of visitors to our city is between 100,000 to 350,000 individuals. The city and the state expect major congestion on I-65 near exits 95, 96, 97 and 98, as well as, highways 41, 31-W, 386 (Vietnam Veterans) and 174 (Long Hollow Pike) which could lead to very heavy traffic on side roads and in neighborhoods. All City of Goodlettsville Departments will be fully staffed in response to this event. Please be aware of your surroundings and report any suspicious activity to Goodlettsville Emergency Communications at 615-859-3405 or 911 in the event of an emergency.

The City would also like to advise residents that looking directly at the sun is unsafe except during the brief total phase of a solar eclipse (“totality”), when the moon entirely blocks the sun’s bright face, which will happen only within the narrow path of totality at approximately 1:28 p.m. on Monday the 21st.

The only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as “eclipse glasses” or hand-held solar viewers.

  • Always inspect your solar filter before use; if scratched or damaged, discard it. Read and follow any instructions printed on or packaged with the filter.
  • Always supervise children using solar filters.
  • Stand still and cover your eyes with your eclipse glasses or solar viewer before looking up at the bright sun. After looking at the sun, turn away and remove your filter — do not remove it while looking at the sun.
  • Do not look at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun through an unfiltered camera, telescope, binoculars, or other optical device.
  • Similarly, do not look at the sun through a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device while using your eclipse glasses or hand-held solar viewer — the concentrated solar rays will damage the filter and enter your eye(s), causing serious injury.
  • Seek expert advice from an astronomer before using a solar filter with a camera, a telescope, binoculars, or any other optical device. Note that solar filters must be attached to the front of any telescope, binoculars, camera lens, or other optics.
  • If you are within the path of totality, remove your solar filter only when the moon completely covers the sun’s bright face and it suddenly gets quite dark. Experience totality, then, as soon as the bright sun begins to reappear, replace your solar viewer to look at the remaining partial phases.
  • Outside the path of totality, you must always use a safe solar filter to view the sun directly.
  • If you normally wear eyeglasses, keep them on. Put your eclipse glasses on over them, or hold your handheld viewer in front of them.

Note: Please make sure your eclipse glasses are compliant with the ISO 12312-2 safety standard

Additional Info...
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